Calvin and the Reformed Tradition

On the Work of Christ and the Order of Salvation

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Description

"This forcefully written and persuasively argued book casts in relief the diversity and complexity of the Reformed tradition in the early modern period. With an astonishing grasp of a broad range of sources, Muller offers a challenging and illuminating examination of the tightly woven relations between theology and history. The analysis is penetrating and the arguments break new ground, all in conversation with generations of scholarship on Reformed thought. Essential reading."
--Bruce Gordon, Yale Divinity School

"Once again, Muller has provided us with a sophisticated and provocative analysis of the Reformed tradition. He teaches us that this tradition stemmed from multiple backgrounds, relied on various predecessors and sources, and must be understood in terms of changing circumstances. This book is indispensable for understanding the development of the theology of the Reformed tradition."
--Susan Schreiner, University of Chicago Divinity School

"Written with Muller's usual candor and suffused with a mastery of the original sources, these essays are a welcome defense of the integrity and independence of the Reformed tradition's sixteenth- and seventeenth-century exponents against those who would distort the historical record or reduce them to a series of footnotes to a Calvin who never existed. Sensitive to historical context and literary genre as well as to the influence of theological traditions and biblical exegesis, these essays are a clinic in responsible historical-theological method."
--John L. Thompson, Fuller Theological Seminary; author of Reading the Bible with the Dead

"Richard Muller has been the key player in the extensive revision of how the theology of Calvin and his contemporaries is understood to relate to that of the later Reformed tradition. Wide-ranging in scope, penetrating in argument, and breathtaking in scholarship, these essays are representative of Muller at his very best."
--Carl R. Trueman, Westminster Theological Seminary

"In this impressive book, Muller gives a clarion call for scholars to awaken from their dogmatic slumbers when approaching the early Reformed tradition and Reformed orthodoxy on the application of Christ's work, union with Christ, and the order of salvation. Full of nuance and fresh historical insight that cuts through muddy thinking, this is an indispensable resource."
--J. Todd Billings, Western Theological Seminary, Holland, Michigan

Contributors

Richard A. Muller, Author

Richard A. Muller (PhD, Duke University) is P. J. Zondervan Professor of Historical Theology Emeritus and senior fellow of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is the author of numerous books, including Divine Will and Human Choice, Calvin and the Reformed Tradition, The Unaccommodated Calvin, After Calvin, and the multivolume Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics.

View more by Richard A. Muller

RICHARD MULLER, Author

Richard a. Muller, Author

Richard A. Muller (PhD, Duke University) is P. J. Zondervan Professor of Historical Theology Emeritus and senior fellow of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is the author of numerous books, including Divine Will and Human Choice, Calvin and the Reformed Tradition, The Unaccommodated Calvin, After Calvin, and the multivolume Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics.

View more by Richard a. Muller

Richard A. Muller, Author

Richard A. Muller (PhD, Duke University) is P. J. Zondervan Professor of Historical Theology Emeritus and senior fellow of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is the author of numerous books, including Divine Will and Human Choice, Calvin and the Reformed Tradition, The Unaccommodated Calvin, After Calvin, and the multivolume Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics.

View more by Richard A. Muller