Reformed Dogmatics

Sin and Salvation in Christ

by Herman Bavinck (Author)John Bolt (Editor)
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Hardcover
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Description

"This is one of those seminal works that embodies a significant portion of our Reformed theological heritage. We all should rejoice to see this material finally available in English!"
--Samuel T. Logan Jr., Westminster Theological Seminary

"Like Augustine, Calvin, and Edwards, Bavinck was a man of giant mind, vast learning, ageless wisdom, and great expository skill. Solid but lucid, demanding but satisfying, broad and deep and sharp and stabilizing, Bavinck's magisterial Reformed Dogmatics remains after a century the supreme achievement of its kind."
--J. I. Packer, Regent College

"[This] volume covers some key topics in atonement theory. Among other things, it offers an excellent survey of the complex distinctions in classical Reformed discussions of covenant theology as well as a nuanced exploration of various topics in soteriology. . . . This is a book that can be read profitably from beginning to end. But it will also reward the teacher or preacher who picks it up on occasion to drop in on Bavinck's discussion of a specific topic."
--Richard J. Mouw, Interpretation

"An important theological work. . . . In Bavinck, we find trajectories of Reformed theology in dialogue with classic Reformed formulations of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries as well as with the varieties of viewpoints current in Bavinck's day. This work provides a clear and detailed account of a Reformed system that has significantly shaped generations of Reformed theologians."
--Donald K. McKim, Sixteenth Century Journal

"The continued translation of Bavinck's masterful theological exposition is to be welcomed by all who care about theology and its service to the church."
--R. Albert Mohler Jr., Preaching

Contributors

Herman Bavinck, Author

Herman Bavinck (1854-1921) succeeded Abraham Kuyper as professor of systematic theology at the Free University of Amsterdam in 1902.

View more by Herman Bavinck

John Bolt, Editor